CELAC

  • Published on 3 August 2016 by teleSUR.

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    Evo Morales said the Pacific Alliance trade bloc is a neo-colonial tool intended to cripple regional trade initiatives that exclude the U.S.

    Bolivian President Evo Morales issued a scathing criticism Wednesday of the Pacific Alliance Trade Bloc referring to it as a “political, military and financial arm of the empire.”

    “It seeks to put an end to the regional integration initiatives of MERCOSUR, UNASUR and CELAC,” President Morales wrote on twitter.

    Over the last decade and a half several regional integration mechanisms have emerged such as the Bolivarian Alliance for the Peoples of Our America (ALBA), the Union of South American Nations (UNASUR) and the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC), which was formed with the goal of strengthening domestic and regional sovereignty.

  • Published on 2 November 2015 by Telesur English

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    The 33 member countries of the Community of Latin American and Caribbean States (CELAC) are set to agree on a joint position that for the first time ever the bloc will present at a COP climate change summit. The CELAC is meeting this week in Ecuador to discuss their position to be presented in the upcoming COP21, also known as the 2015 Paris U.N. Climate Conference, officials said Monday.

    The foreign and environment ministries of the regional organization will meet on Thursday and Friday in the Ecuadorean capital Quito, to elaborate the draft that will be presented in December in Paris, which has been billed as the most important climate summit in history. The meeting will take place at Union of South American Countries (UNASUR) headquarters.

    Latin America and the Caribbean are expected to play a very important role at the COP21, since the region has over the past years shown a strong commitment in forging very important global agreements to address climate change.

    The Bolivian city of Cochabamba last month held the Second World People’s Conference on Climate Change, during which President Evo Morales along with his colleagues from Ecuador, Rafael Correa, and Venezuela, Nicolas Maduro, agreed to speak for the “Pachamama,” or Mother Earth, and civil society during the COP21 summit in Paris.

  • Published on 29 January 2016 by Telesur English

    haiti election crisis

    Haiti's President Michel Martelly announced that he will not leave his post in government next week if another leader is not elected into office, saying he will not leave the country “in the midst of uncertainty.” 

    The announcement comes after widespread protests over alleged electoral fraud in October's presidential elections led to the indefinite suspension of the second round of voting. 

    Despite the election suspension, there was some speculation that Martelly would still leave office by his Feb. 7 deadline with an interim government installed in his place, however the president shot down these plans Thursday. 

    “I will not accept handing over power to those who do not want to go to elections,” said Martelly. “After February 7, if you have not reached an agreement, I will not leave the country in the midst of uncertainty,” added the Haitian president. 

    The current political crisis goes back many years, however, according to Haitian historian Susy Castor, talking to teleSUR. “Its an expression of situations that haven’t been solved for over a century, from when we had the North American occupation in 1915 … and the post occupation system hasn’t solved our problems.”

    Amidst the political crisis, it was also revealed Friday that President of the Electoral Council, Pierre-Louis Opont, was resigning from his post.Opont announced his decision to the president via a letter Thursday, which was leaked to the press Friday. The resignation had long been demanded by the opposition and Haiti's economic forum who accused the former electoral president of fraud in the first round of the presidential elections in October. 

    The future of Haiti's elections are unclear, but the opposition wants Martelly to step down and the president of the Supreme Court to lead an interim government in his stead. They have also asked the top court to investigate allegations of electoral fraud as well as replace the members of the country's electoral authority and set a new date for elections.

  • Published on 4 August 2016 by teleSUR.

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    Defence of the Spanish Republic during Spain’s civil war is probably the most well-known modern European example of a highly organized and committed progressive solidarity movement. Currently, international solidarity activity in the Americas and in Europe remains closely associated with progressive political movements and governments working to defend their peoples against NATO country aggression of one kind or another. They do so despite determined efforts at co-option by Western governments and corporations along with their media and NGOs.

    Selfless people in solidarity with grassroots resistance from Palestine to Mexico have made huge sacrifices trying to defend vulnerable communities from aggression and abuse. In Palestine, Rachel Corrie’s supreme valour put the US government and its NATO country allies to shame for their abject collusion in Israel’s destruction of the Palestinian people. In Oaxaca, activist reporter Brad Will was murdered covering yet more repression by systemically corrupt, violence-addicted authorities in Mexico. Recently in Honduras, international solidarity activists bravely confronted the notoriously violent Honduran security forces in order to commemorate Berta Caceres and defend her legacy of resistance.

  • Published on 3 March 2016 by teleSUR.

    Obama

    The executive order, first signed by Obama last year, imposed sanctions on Venezuela.

     U.S. President Barack Obama renewed Thursday an executive order issued last March that declared Venezuela “an unusual and extraordinary threat to the national security and foreign policy of the United States.” 

    The renewal of the decree is valid for one year and was revealed in a letter from Obama to congressional leaders. In the letter, the U.S. president claims that alleged conditions that first prompted the order had “not improved.”

    The executive order was first issued by Obama in March 2015 and provoked a storm of controversy inside Venezuela and a backlash throughout Latin America.

    Leaders from throughout the region condemned the decree.